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Nuclear Proliferation

Many experts consider the containment of nuclear weapons capabilities to be America’s most important foreign policy challenge. Yet the subject receives relatively little media attention. TCF has attempted to elevate the public’s awareness of this crucial issue.


Thanassis Cambanis

Featured Fellow

Thanassis Cambanis

Thanassis Cambanis is a journalist specializing in the Middle East and American foreign policy.


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  • -Ahmadinejad seemed to acknowledge that the hostility that characterizes U.S.-Iranian relations is not helpful to either: “I accept that the conditions between the United States and Iran have negatively affected both—and perhaps negatively affected the world at large.”
    Sep 24, 2012
  • Those who toil in the bowels of the threat industrial complex (trademark pending) have several tools at their disposal for hyping threats and...
    May 17, 2012
  • Not surprisingly, This Week in Threat-Mongering begins in a usual place—Leon Panetta's mouth. Here he is last Thursday  being interviewed by Judy...
    May 10, 2012
  • Senior Fellow Jeffrey Laurenti looks back at 2010's best & worst International Affairs developments.
    Dec 27, 2010
  • President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitri A. Medvedev resolved the last sticking points in their arms control negotiations and announced their intention to sign early next month a new treaty reducing American and Russian nuclear arsenals. The treaty announcement initiates a rapid succession of developments on the nuclear arms front:  NATO's reassessment of nuclear weapons' role in alliance strategic doctrine; a U.S. nuclear posture review that will presumably reflect Obama's Prague commitments; a summit on nuclear weapons issues that Obama will host in April; Security Council consideration of measures to rein in Iran's nuclear program; and the nuclear nonproliferation treaty (NPT) review conference in May.  
    Mar 29, 2010
  • When President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitri A. Medvedev signed a treaty reducing American and Russian nuclear arsenals, they initiated a rapid succession of developments on the nuclear arms front. Are we seeing an unprecedented "Springtime for Disarmament"?
    Mar 28, 2010
  • When President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitri A. Medvedev signed a treaty reducing American and Russian nuclear arsenals, they initiated a rapid succession of developments on the nuclear arms front. Are we seeing an unprecedented "Springtime for Disarmament"?
    Mar 28, 2010
  • When President Barack Obama and Russian President Dmitri A. Medvedev signed a treaty reducing American and Russian nuclear arsenals, they initiated a rapid succession of developments on the nuclear arms front. Are we seeing an unprecedented "Springtime for Disarmament"?
    Mar 28, 2010
  • The Century Foundation and the UNA-USA Southern New York State Division hosted the Mid-Atlantic Regional Conference, open to the public as the 2010 UNA-USA Members’ Day. Amid urgent public concerns about the world economic crisis, the dangers of nuclear weapons, and the continuing war in Afghanistan, the Year of Crises conference program featured the following elements: 
    Feb 19, 2010
  • In Iran’s dynamic political landscape, few issues unite conservative and reformist leaders, and even fewer topics inspire broad-based public enthusiasm. But Iran’s nuclear program has proven to unify a country that is habitually – some might say, congenitally – divided.
    Apr 26, 2009
  • The North Korean legacy left by the Bush administration to President Obama reminds one of the baseball manager’s rant to his centerfielder’s incessant errors: “You screwed up that position so badly no one will ever be able to play it again.”
    Feb 25, 2009
  • One of the most ominous issues which President-elect Barack Obama will face in his first months in office is the matter of the growing array of nuclear weapons around the globe. Today there are 27,000 nuclear weapons of various kinds in the world today – of which 26,000 belong to the US and Russia. How does this country work toward reducing the numbers of these dangerous devices to lower the possibility of nuclear mishaps and ward off the chances of accidental missile launches and prevent bombs like these from falling into the hands of terrorists?
    Nov 18, 2008
  • Emeritus Trustee & former special counsel and adviser to President John F. Kennedy, Theodore C. Sorensen considers the fundamental changes The United States needs to make in our approach to nuclear weapons.
    Sep 10, 2008
  • In his recent address on nuclear weapons at the University of Denver, Sen. John McCain signaled a retreat from the in-your-face unilateralism of the Bush-Cheney years.
    Jun 5, 2008
  • In his address on nuclear weapons at the University of Denver Tuesday, Senator John McCain signaled a retreat from the in-your-face unilateralism of the Bush-Cheney years.
    May 29, 2008
  • Weapons dangers, especially nuclear-related ones, have alarmed publics and leaders in recent years to a degree not seen since the height of the cold war. Yet agreement on how to address them has often been elusive. After years of seeming paralysis, it seems that changes of national leadership and in the terms of debate in many leading countries just might signal new possibilities of convergence and action. The Century Foundation and the Friedrich Ebert Stiftung held a luncheon discussion on Thursday, April 10th, titled Windows of Opportunity? Prospects and Challenges for Reversing Weapons Threats. Leading this discussion was Graham Allison, director of the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and professor of government at Harvard, and former U.S. assistant secretary of Defense and Hans Blix, chairman of the Weapons of Mass Destruction Commission (Stockholm) and former head of UNMOVIC and the International Atomic Energy Agency.
    Apr 10, 2008
  • Agreement on how to address weapons dangers has often been elusive. After years of seeming paralysis, it seems that changes of national leadership and in the terms of debate in many leading countries just might signal new possibilities of convergence and action.
    Apr 9, 2008
  • Agreement on how to address weapons dangers has often been elusive. After years of seeming paralysis, it seems that changes of national leadership and in the terms of debate in many leading countries just might signal new possibilities of convergence and action.
    Apr 9, 2008
  • Agreement on how to address weapons dangers has often been elusive. After years of seeming paralysis, it seems that changes of national leadership and in the terms of debate in many leading countries just might signal new possibilities of convergence and action.
    Apr 9, 2008
  • Agreement on how to address weapons dangers has often been elusive. After years of seeming paralysis, it seems that changes of national leadership and in the terms of debate in many leading countries just might signal new possibilities of convergence and action.
    Apr 9, 2008
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